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Wednesday, 01.12.2021

Thomas A. Ban: The Ewen Cameron Story

 

Barry Blackwell´s reply to Héctor Warnes´comment on hiscomment "Science and the Marchiavelli Syndrome"

 

       As always Hector Warnes’ erudite comments provide a credible view of Ewen Cameron’s use of depatterning and psychic driving and the extent to which this was therapeutic or harmful. Cameron certainly practiced with a broad palate which I would never categorize as “only biological.” Indeed, I began my search for the truth by reading Sidney Gottlieb’s book (Blackwell 2020) in which he espoused credible psychotherapeutic theories and strategies for dealing with recalcitrant patients (Cameron 1941).  Clearly, he was a man on a mission, determined to push the boundaries of his field to find cures for the previously incurable, perhaps with the lure of a Nobel Prize in mind.

       This provided a sinister clinical synchrony between what Cameron was attempting and the brainwashing goals of the MKULTRA program.

       It is clear from Tom Ban’s personal account that when concern about that program erupted publicly, Ewen immediately destroyed all records of his work, fled from the scene and permanently abandoned that line of enquiry.

       Understandably there is diversity between colleagues who worked with Ewen and who were charmed by his charisma and undisputed talents versus those like myself who seek a rational solution to the enigma his behavior presents. I believe the Machiavelli Syndrome is a logical and credible hypothesis but Cameron’s early, untimely and suspicious death complicates and conceals the truth.

       He died from a fall in a climbing accident; “death by a fall” was the ideal murder scenario Gottlieb advocated to silence the possibility a colleague might reveal secrets under duress, in this case during the legal allegations and enquiries into alleged malpractice.

       That risk remained even after Cameron’s death. So, years later, when the law finally caught up with Gottlieb he avoided trial by ending his own life, using his extensive knowledge of fatal compounds.

      The lifetimes of both Cameron and Gottlieb share the same Machiavellian aura.

 

Reference:

Blackwell B. Steven Kinzer: Poisoner in Chief: Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control. New York: Henry Holt & Co; 2019. Reviewed by Barry Blackwell. inhn.org.perspectives. March 19, 2020.

 

May 6, 2021