You are here: Dictionary / Endogenous enhancer regulation by Joseph Knoll
Monday, 26.06.2017

ENDOGENOUS ENHANCER REGULATION

By Joseph Knoll

The term endogenous enhancer regulation (EER) refers to the existence of enhancer-sensitive neurons in the brain, which have the potential to increase in a split second their activity in response to a specific endogenous enhancer substance, such as β-phenylethylamine and return equally rapidly to their original activity level in the absence of the enhancer substance. The term was coined by Joseph Knoll in his monograph The Brain and Its Self. A Neurochemical Concept of the Innate and Acquired Drives,  published in 2005. The concept of EER is based on the finding that the electrical stimulation induced increase in norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the brain stem was significantly greater in animals after PEA administration  (Knoll et al 1996).

  

Knoll J. The Brain and Its Self. A Neurochemical Concept of the Innate and Acquired Drives. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg/New York,2005,pp. 25-94

Knoll J., Miklya I., Knoll B., Markó  R., Rácz D. Phenylethylamine and tyramine are mixed acting sympathomimetic amines in the brain. Life Sciences 1996; 58: 2101-2114

 

Joseph Knoll

October 23, 2014